Repentance 

QUOTE: “We all want progress, but if you’re on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road” – C.S. Lewis

Note:

Source:

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Before Change, Stop and Think

I appreciate the wisdom of Jim Collins, author of the classic 2001 book on beneficial change in organizations, Good to Great, as well as many other books on business. At New Years, we are always thinking about change, and he has some very specific advice for us:

I want to give you a lobotomy about change. I want you to forget everything you’ve ever learned about what it takes to create great results. I want you to realize that nearly all operating prescriptions for creating large-scale corporate change are nothing but myths.

The Myth of the Change Program: This approach comes with the launch event, the tag line, and the cascading activities.

The Myth of the Burning Platform: This one says that change starts only when there’s a crisis that persuades “unmotivated” employees to accept the need for change.

The Myth of Stock Options: Stock options, high salaries, and bonuses are incentives that grease the wheels of change.

The Myth of Fear-Driven Change: The fear of being left behind, the fear of watching others win, the fear of presiding over monumental failure—all are drivers of change, we’re told.

The Myth of Acquisitions: You can buy your way to growth, so it figures that you can buy your way to greatness.

The Myth of Technology-Driven Change: The breakthrough that you’re looking for can be achieved by using technology to leapfrog the competition.

The Myth of Revolution: Big change has to be wrenching, extreme, painful—one big, discontinuous, shattering break.

Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Totally wrong.

Before we talk about exactly what works in changing an organization, take a minute to review the list above as a checklist for what you had planned. If your “big idea” sounds like any of the above “myths” – actually mistakes – you need to pause and think before you  take a leap of faith.

The first thing to rethink is your idea that what needs to change is your organization. Or your company, team, family, community, marriage … substitute whatever you would like. What needs most to change is YOU … and that’s where to start.

You’ve created the status quo. You have a role in it. If you change yourself, then everything connected to you will likewise change. That’s the basic meaning of systems where you are one of many interconnected elements. If you advise change but do not change yourself, the change you imagine will be sabotaged. If you try to fix the organization, or another person, without changing yourself, your connected role will result in the work you intend to achieve to unravel and fall apart. Because it is external to you and your role in it.

People know this. Every team and organization is very familiar with announcements by the leader: “It’s time for everything to change so that we can achieve our dreams!” Another ten point program, book to read, workshop to attend and a motivational speech about what failures they have been to achieve the current status quo – whatever that is.

What they’ve learned, to their regret, is that nothing changes with this sort of change. It’s not everything that will change, just a few things that bug the leader; what bothers the people will not be addressed. It’s not the people’s dreams, but the leader’s dreams; what the people desire and dream of does not come up. Why? Because the leader has bypassed the people to get on with the plan, and left the people behind. And demotivated, when they remember all the frequent and familiar announcements like this one in the past.

As Jim Collins puts it: Here are the facts of life about these and other change myths. Companies that make the change from good to great have no name for their transformation—and absolutely no program. They neither rant nor rave about a crisis—and they don’t manufacture one where none exists. They don’t “motivate” people—their people are self-motivated. There’s no evidence of a connection between money and change mastery. And fear doesn’t drive change—but it does perpetuate mediocrity. Nor can acquisitions provide a stimulus for greatness: Two mediocrities never make one great company. Technology is certainly important—but it comes into play only after change has already begun. And as for the final myth, dramatic results do not come from dramatic process—not if you want them to last, anyway. A serious revolution, one that feels like a revolution to those going through it, is highly unlikely to bring about a sustainable leap from being good to being great.  

Effective change begins by the leader changing. It’s possible that if you start there, you won’t need to make any sort of announcement at all; people who are connected to you may just adjust to your new way of being and doing.

So before you embark on changing everyone else, or changing the world, stop and think. Then move forward wisely.

 

SOURCES

Quote in italics above is from the article: GOOD TO GREAT by Jim Collins; Fast Company, October 2001   http://www.jimcollins.com/article_topics/articles/good-to-great.html#articletop

Book: Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…And Others Don’t  by Jim Collins; HarperBusiness; 1 edition (July 19, 2011)

Review of the book: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_to_Great

Photo by “OneMethod” courtesy of the Flickr Creative Commons license – https://www.flickr.com/photos/27139311@N04/5497356156/

 

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Putting the computer on a diet …

My goal for New Years Day … a freeware program, Duplicate Cleaner Free 3.2.7 is currently deleting 92,000+ duplicate files from my desktop. My goal is to build a working archive folder with ONE copy of everything I’ve created since I’ve started saving stuff on computers. And that’s a lot of files.

One reason there are so many files is my tendency to create backup folders of work in progress. That’s mostly what’s being removed – backup files. The starting folder held 117 gigabytes of material – word processing, powerpoint, and a few photos. No movies or music. But at all the various steps of the doctor of ministry program at Fuller, each term paper, each chapter of the dissertation, each document created for teaching later … plus all of the sermons, bible studies and newsletter articles and such. And copies of each item in progress.

I’m paranoid of losing something, and frequently have. The simplest error is to open a document other than the most recent version … and then saving it. This wipes out a later version … and when you copy it onto your backup, sometimes you erase a later version with an earlier version.

Once it’s all done … yes, I’ll create – immediately – backup files of my working archive folder. I’ve been hoping to do this for about six months now.

The software just finished – and it reduced the Working Archive from 117 gigabytes to 54.8 gigabytes –  more than half. And I still have all those working versions intact – just one copy of them. And I still have a copy of my bloated archive as a backup, and a sense of confidence about turning the software loose on my entire computer (it automatically locks out program files, windows directory, etc.)

If you would like to investigate this software … here’s a link:

Duplicate CleanerDuplicate Cleaner

https://www.digitalvolcano.co.uk/duplicatecleaner.html

Some information on the software from the manufacturer:

The pro version is less than $30 – required for business or commercial use, but with significant enhancements to make it quicker and more convenient.

Duplicate Cleaner is a useful program to help you organize the contents of your home hard drive or corporate network. You’d be surprised just how many redundant or duplicate files you could find forgotten in an obscure documents folder.
Duplicate Cleaner will deep scan for all types of files – photos, music, films, video, Word documents, PowerPoint presentations, text files – you name it, if it appears twice on your computer then Duplicate Cleaner will find it. Once these files are found you are provided with helpful tools to enable you to select which copies to delete or move.These files can be deleted to the recycle bin or moved elsewhere.

Here’s a link to a Youtube tutorial on using DuplicateCleaner:

Here is the manufacturer’s 12 reasons to upgrade to Pro:

  • Find resized, rotated, flipped or edited images and photos. Compare side by side with the image viewer.
  • Scan and delete inside zip files. Flexible folder and zip scanning options.
  • Locate duplicated folder structures and easily browse and remove them.
  • Save your frequently used searches as Duplicate Cleaner Profiles.
  • Powerfully shape your search – set Master folders: only files which duplicate the ones in the Master will be listed
  • Search out unique/non-duplicate files.
  • Move, copy, rename duplicate files or turn them into Hard Links.
  • Ultra reliable SHA-1, SHA-256 and SHA-512 file hashing, as well as byte scanning.
  • Launch and scan via the command line or a batch file.
  • Filter the results by group markings, file types, paths and more.
  • Many extra functions to make working with your duplicate files easier.
  • Use Duplicate Cleaner in a commercial environment.
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DM101 – Module 5.24: Additional Materials for EVANGELISM OUTSIDE THE BOX


DM101 – Module 5.24: Additional Materials for EVANGELISM OUTSIDE THE BOX

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DM101 – Module 5.23 Worksheet: Who are your 8.5?

DM101 – Module 5.23 Worksheet: Who are your 8.5?

Ralph Neighbour: “The typical church-goer relates to only five to eight people for at least one full hour per week per person, and half of those Christians cannot name a single unbeliever among their close friends. Many of them have not even made a new acquaintance in the past twelve months. They live in little personal bubbles, having no interest in people who live and work close to them.” Natural Church Development research indicates the average Christian has 8.5 weekly contacts with unbelievers.
Who are your 8.5? What are you going to do about it?

Ralph W. Neighbour, Where Do We Go From Here, 101. Emphasis in original. Christian Schwarz, Natural Church Development: A Guide to Eight Essential Qualities of Healthy Churches, 35.

 

COMMENTS

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

*Reflection Question 1.1.5:

SOURCES:

The photo “Disciple Making 101” is by David Kueker.

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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DM101 – Module 5.22 Worksheet: H is for Harvest – Side Doors

DM101 – Module 5.22 Worksheet: H is for Harvest – Side Doors

REVIEWING THE FOUR CORNERED ROOM:
Discussion: How could you open up side doors to each of the corners for new people to enter from the outside BEFORE they attend worship? Why would this be beneficial?

H is for Harvest – Side Doors

COMMENTS

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

*Reflection Question 1.1.5:

SOURCES:

The photo “Disciple Making 101” is by David Kueker.

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

 

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DM101 – Module 5.21 Worksheet: S is for Service – Side Doors

DM101 – Module 5.21 Worksheet: S is for Service – Side Doors

REVIEWING THE FOUR CORNERED ROOM:
Discussion: How could you open up side doors to each of the corners for new people to enter from the outside BEFORE they attend worship? Why would this be beneficial?

S is for Service – Side Doors

 

COMMENTS

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

*Reflection Question 1.1.5:

SOURCES:

The photo “Disciple Making 101” is by David Kueker.

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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DM101 – Module 5.20 Worksheet: I is for Interest – Side Doors

DM101 – Module 5.20 Worksheet: I is for Interest – Side Doors

REVIEWING THE FOUR CORNERED ROOM:
Discussion: How could you open up side doors to each of the corners for new people to enter from the outside BEFORE they attend worship? Why would this be beneficial?

I is for Interest – Side Doors

 

COMMENTS

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

*Reflection Question 1.1.5:

SOURCES:

The photo “Disciple Making 101” is by David Kueker.

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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DM101 – Module 5.19 F is for Fellowship – Side Doors

DM101 – Module 5.19 F is for Fellowship – Side Doors

REVIEWING THE FOUR CORNERED ROOM:
Discussion: How could you open up side doors to each of the corners for new people to enter from the outside BEFORE they attend worship? Why would this be beneficial?

F is for Fellowship – Side Doors

 

COMMENTS

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

*Reflection Question 1.1.5:

SOURCES:

The photo “Disciple Making 101” is by David Kueker.

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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DM101 – Module 5.18 Worksheet: Easum’s Big Three

DM101 – Module 5.18 Worksheet: Easum’s Big Three

O. Organize a church softball team.
P. Open a church daycare program.
Q. Have classes on toilet training toddlers.

COMMENTS

REFLECTION QUESTIONS:

*Reflection Question 1.1.5:

SOURCES:

The photo “Disciple Making 101” is by David Kueker.

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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