DM101 – Module 2:

Assignment #4. Download and complete the Module 2.3 Worksheets.
These are first two corners of the Four Cornered Room – Fellowship and Interest. In our small groups you will be sharing an inventory of what you currently do in that “corner” in your local church inside the text box. You could get a head start by listing what your church is now doing. The area outside the box is to list great ideas from others that you hear in your small group or in the class sharing.
The F or Fellowship corner is for activities where the primary focus is Fun and Friendship, and especially if they help relationships form or deepen.
The I or Interest corner is about learning opportunities in your church. There are three kinds of classes inside the church box … easier classes are on the bottom of the box, closer to the Fellowship corner, and the level of commitment required increases as we rise to the top of the Interest box.
There are two columns to the “outside of the box” for the Interest Corner Worksheet – the column to the left is to write ideas for learning which happen inside the church and are spiritual in nature. The area to the outside, to the right of the box, is for classes which are outside of what we would normally consider spiritual or church related … but where people would still have an interest.
At the bottom of each “inside the box” is a chance for you to evaluate what you are doing in your local church … is it balanced? Is this need underserved and neglected? Or is this need overdone, with more happening than is needed?
You can imagine small groups in your local church as located along the wall between the corners for Fellowship and Interest. As we move from the “F” corner along the wall to the “I” corner, the focus of groups changes from being entirely relationship oriented to being more and more task oriented – learning is a task.

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Spiritual Practice

I thought of you when I read this quote from “Mudhouse Sabbath: An Invitation to a Life of Spiritual Discipline: An Invitation to a Life of Spiritual Disciplines (Pocket Classics)” by Lauren F. Winner –

““Spiritual practice” is a phrase that means what it says. Madeline L’Engle once likened spiritual practice to piano etudes: You do not necessarily enjoy the etudes—you want to skip right ahead to the sonatas and concertos—but if you don’t work through the etudes you will arrive at the sonatas and not know what to do. So, too, with the spiritual life. It’s not all about mountaintops. Mostly it’s about training so that you’ll know the mountaintop for what it is when you get there. All religions have spiritual practices. Buddhists burn sage and meditate. Muslims avail themselves of their prayer rugs. Christian tradition has developed a wealth of practices, too: fasting, almsgiving, vigil-keeping, confessing, meditating. True enough, Christians in America—especially Protestants in America—have not historically practiced those practices with much discipline, but that is beginning to change. In churches and homes everywhere people are increasingly interested in doing Christianity, not just speaking or believing it. Here is the place where so-called Jewish-Christian relations become practical. If the church wants to grow in its attendance to, in its doing of things for the God of Israel, we might want to take a few tips from the Jewish community.”

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/coBxtix

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Commandment vs. Closer To God

I thought of you when I read this quote from “Mudhouse Sabbath: An Invitation to a Life of Spiritual Discipline: An Invitation to a Life of Spiritual Disciplines (Pocket Classics)” by Lauren F. Winner –

“The Jewish practices I wish to translate into a Christian idiom are binding upon Jews. Jews are obligated to fulfill the particularities of Mosaic law. They don’t light Sabbath candles simply because candles make them feel close to God, but because God commanded the lighting of candles: Closeness might be a nice by-product, but it is not the point. Christians will understand candle-lighting a little differently. Spiritual practices don’t justify us. They don’t save us. Rather, they refine our Christianity; they make the inheritance Christ gives us on the Cross more fully our own. The spiritual disciplines—such as regular prayer, and fasting, and tithing, and attentiveness to our bodies—can form us as Christians throughout our lives. Are we obligated to observe these disciplines? Not generally, no. Will they get us into heaven? They will not. Practicing the spiritual disciplines does not make us Christians. Instead, the practicing teaches us what it means to live as Christians. (There is an etymological clue here—discipline is related to the word disciple.) The ancient disciplines form us to respond to God, over and over always, in gratitude, in obedience, and in faith. Herewith, a small book of musings on and explorations in those practices. Na’aseh v’nishma.”

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/1luVkNN

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Clutter: Set your problems free…

I thought of you when I read this quote from “The Happiness Project: Or, Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun” by Gretchen Rubin –

“First, I got rid of items that no one should be wearing anymore. Good-bye, baggy yoga pants . Next I pulled out the items that, realistically, I knew I wouldn’t wear. Good-bye, gray sweater that barely covered my navel. Then the culling got harder.”

Three levels of clutter clearing.

1. What is obvious.

2. What I currently ignore… for a reason.

3. What does not work … learning to release rather than fix a problem.

The simplest way to solve a problem is to let go of it. Set your problems free … let it go. Let them wander off to find a happier place.

Dealing with clinging parasite problems by detaching. Current reality is a win for them but not for you. Practice Win-Win Or No Deal.

Clarity and decision-making are often enough. Make sure that you understand the problem in great detail, because the problem may be you and not the item. If you understand the problem, you will become aware of it happening again and be able to prevent it from becoming established. Once you understand the problem you will understand how to detach yourself from the places where the problem attaches itself to you

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/dGpWt4U

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MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #7

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #7 – thoughts from the message from the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer
#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … At Kinmundy United Methodist Church.

 

 

I love the 23rd Psalm. When I’m feeling really stressed, I’ll find myself reciting it sometimes under my breath. “The Lord is my Shepherd, I shall not want. He makes me to lie down in green pastures.” By the way, that’s daily bread for sheep. “He leads me beside still waters.” By the way, that’s Mountain Dew for sheep. “He restores my soul.” If we will follow the Shepherd, we will have what we need for today.

And as I thought about that last night, I thought about these two young sheep following mom and dad. And you know what? I don’t believe that baby sheep are any different than kids. There they are following along behind mom and dad saying, “Are we there yet? Are we there yet?” Do you have kids that do that? Do you remember that? “Are we there yet?”

And you can just hear mom or dad sheep calling back, “Nope. Not yet.”

“Well, mom and daddy, how do you know?”

“Well, son, we don’t stop till there are green pastures. We just keep going. We don’t stop till there are still waters. We just keep going. Do you see the green pastures? We’re not there yet, then. We just got to keep going.”

“Well, mom and daddy, where are we going?”

“We are going to follow the shepherd. We need to know where he is, not where we’re going to end up. We need to follow him and then when we see the green pastures, that is when we’ll lie down.” When you have what you need, your daily bread, then stop and give thanks and enjoy. But until you see that, you just keep moving forward because the Lord is going to continue to answer your prayers.

Jesus says to us: “Don’t be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious about itself. Let the day’s own trouble be sufficient for the day.” Every time we pray, “Lord give us this day our daily bread” we are redirecting our attention from a future which we can not predict. And since we can not predict it, it is very difficult for us to accurately be afraid. Whenever we pray this prayer, we direct our attention to, “Has God taken care of us today?” If so, let us give thanks and then pay attention to what God has for us to do. As you do the math, once you determine that you have enough for today, you don’t need to calculate everything that could go wrong tomorrow. There will be plenty of time to fix what’s broken tomorrow, tomorrow.

Please pray with me. Lord, we have a human tendency to worry about the future. We have a human tendency to try to predict what will go wrong tomorrow or next week or next month, and then have a plan to deal with it. But Lord, as we develop those plans, we soon begin to drown under the pressure of how many emergencies that we have to get ready for in our imagination. Lord, help us to love today well. And to know that if we listen to You, if we obey Your will, if we follow You today, we can trust Your help to be with us with anything we need to deal with tomorrow. We ask for this help to keep us focused on this day, to stay in the day, in the Name of Jesus Christ …

THINKING IT THROUGH

What gets your attention? Why?

What is the human need or problem here?
What is that like?

What does the text suggest? S.O.W.?

What is the divine solution?
How can we visualize it?
How can we make it happen? What are the steps?

RESOURCES

The photo “Misty Pasture – HDR
is by Nicolas Raymond
and is from https://www.flickr.com/photos/82955120@N05/10076497074/
courtesy of the Flickr.com Creative Commons license.

Overlays are from ChurchArt.com, a subscription service.

This post is based on the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … preached June 11, 2017, at Kinmundy United Methodist Church.
Slides and audio for this message can be downloaded from http://www.disciplewalk.com/K_Sermons_June_Aug_2017.html

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #6

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #6 – thoughts from the message from the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer
#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … At Kinmundy United Methodist Church.

 

 

So here’s a verse that comes after – the Lord’s Prayer. Still talks about daily bread. “Therefore,” Jesus says, “Do not be anxious saying, ‘What shall we eat? What shall we drink? What shall we wear?” Apparently, Jesus understands how those commercials affect us. Why? Verse 32, Jesus says, “For the Gentiles” – the people who don’t know God – “the Gentiles seek all these things.” They’re the most important thing for them. “The Gentiles seek all these things and your heavenly Father knows that you need them all.” God has not forgotten. But Jesus goes on to say, reminding us all that we are sheep under the care of theShepherd, “But seek first His kingdom and His righteousness–” His way of doing things, in other words. “And all these things–” all these things that you worry about. “All these things shall be yours as well. Therefore,” Jesus said, “Do not be anxious about tomorrow.” You don’t need to pray, “Lord, give us the bread for tomorrow.”

THINKING IT THROUGH

What gets your attention? Why?

What is the human need or problem here?
What is that like?

What does the text suggest? S.O.W.?

What is the divine solution?
How can we visualize it?
How can we make it happen? What are the steps?

RESOURCES

The photo “Anxious” is by amandaissnazzy and is from https://www.flickr.com/photos/amandaisso1980s/3754105362/in/photolist-6HJLJw-dfmaa4-4ppRUp-aWDj4p-7a1Lm5-q7tKM-6dgb4q-2d27jh-jQtEnD-bBCKB3-8QqHcZ-7wyoub-REharK-6vFZNZ-57iBRc-9g18Fi-6MW5Ms-5qMv5f-8oLaJ-6FRbkG-2mBsq-9UaGgE-6devRK-d9PNhj-ny1MPp-9byAN-LTXkpU-4gpnWc-3KFSb6-6X6NvX-6LY7bL-4xCKDE-fNmndo-8h3E9U-UtWCQs-8mD4FM-zZvLs-5iL9xv-6Ed7da-9oGkU3-qcmSyp-4V36KB-8ZTBbK-bRtAaV-nAG24-6a6UYd-59FrQQ-4obg7Q-nLxHLf-M3XuY
courtesy of the Flickr.com Creative Commons license.

This post is based on the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … preached June 11, 2017, at Kinmundy United Methodist Church.
Slides and audio for this message can be downloaded from http://www.disciplewalk.com/K_Sermons_June_Aug_2017.html

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Posted in MONDAY SCHOOL | Leave a comment

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #5

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #5 – thoughts from the message from the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer
#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … At Kinmundy United Methodist Church.

 

 

We need to look at the scriptures that are around a given verse because every command comes with a context. So a little bit before this prayer, The Lord’s Prayer, we find these words from Mat 6:7-8: “And in praying, Jesus says, ‘Do not keep up empty phrases as the Gentiles do, for they think that they will be heard for their many words. Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask Him.'”

There is a belief that some people have that if I say, “Lord, give me a new car. Give me a Mercedes-Benz. Give me a yellow Mercedes-Benz. Give me a yellow Mercedes-Benz with a pink top and a fancy stereo system,” and that believe that if you repeat again, and again, and again, and again, and again, and again, and again, and again, and again, as the pile of things that you say gets higher, it’s more likely that your life will change and you’ll find that car in your driveway the next morning.

Jesus says, “Your Heavenly Father knows what you need before you ask Him.” So pray like this, “Give us this day our daily bread,” and take time to let your Heavenly Father explain to you what you need, because then you can pray for what you actually need rather than praying for all those things that commercials have told you that you need to have to be happy.

Listen to the television the next time you have it on. Your basic commercial is simply like this. Everything in your life is bad because you don’t own the right brand of jeans. Furthermore, if you want a pretty girl, you need to buy this pretty car. The root of all the commercials is to tell you that you don’t have what you need. And so you get sucked into worrying and working for things ultimately that do not matter at all. Because what we need to learn is to listen to our heavenly Father and to allow our heavenly Father to shape what we believe we need. And then ask God to bring that to us one day at a time.

 

THINKING IT THROUGH

What gets your attention? Why?

What is the human need or problem here?
What is that like?

What does the text suggest? S.O.W.?

What is the divine solution?
How can we visualize it?
How can we make it happen? What are the steps?

RESOURCES

The photo “Vending Fail” is by scottjacksonx
and is from https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottjacksonx/3027465268/
courtesy of the Flickr.com Creative Commons license.

This post is based on the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … preached June 11, 2017, at Kinmundy United Methodist Church.
Slides and audio for this message can be downloaded from http://www.disciplewalk.com/K_Sermons_June_Aug_2017.html

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Posted in MONDAY SCHOOL | Leave a comment

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #4

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #4 – thoughts from the message from the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer
#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … At Kinmundy United Methodist Church.

 

 

 

 

But even more, there is no point in the world, why I should be fearful, or anxious, or afraid because I already have what I would need to pray for, for today. One of the main points of this phrase is our focus in prayer needs to be on what we need today, not our fears of what we’ll need tomorrow, or next week, or next month, or next year. We need to focus on what we need today because circumstances change. This is a story about my father– told you about him last week. I don’t actually have a picture of him as he’s older, but he became a math teacher. And in the summer, when math teachers did not teach school, he would build, as a carpenter, a building of some sort, houses, and try to sell them. But he had a habit, and he would wake up– now, I’ve always been an early riser, but he would wake up in the morning, even earlier than me. And I realize now, that I’m closer to his age, that he woke up because of his worries. And he would sit at the kitchen table with coffee, and he would buy these little memo pads. You know what they are, the little slips of paper, and there’s a gum at the top. And he would carefully, with a pencil, calculate out, to the penny, how long at current interest rates he would live before the money he had would give out, and he would be dirt broke. And I once asked him, I said, “Dad, what are you doing?”

“I’m calculating to see how long my money will last.”

And I would say, “How long?” And he would name a date. And I have to tell you this: I don’t think that ever helped him. Now Kim will tell you that I am much more comfortable planning out what we should do for the next five years than actually doing anything today. So I understand the fascination of planning out the future. I understand that. But for God’s sakes, if you are going to plan out an imaginary future, plan for good things to happen, because here’s the thing my father did not understand. He calculated out what things would be like if interest rates stayed the same. And they never do, do they? Most of the time they get worse. Everything he calculated on into the future depended on variables that would not stay the same.

After he did all this, he would get up and do today what he needed to do today for tomorrow to be a good day. And so I want to tell you, he never did run out of money. But for us to do the math that feeds our fears and anxiety is generally not a good use of our time. When you’re doing your calculating, it’s enough for you to calculate up to the point of asking the question, “Do I have what I need today?” Yes.

Then get up and go back to work. You don’t need to do the math beyond that. That’s what I’d say to him today if I could. And every time I am tempted to get out little pieces of paper and write down everything that could go wrong, I try to remind myself of the same things. And so we understand the scripture line, “Give us this day our daily bread.”

THINKING IT THROUGH

What gets your attention? Why?

What is the human need or problem here?
What is that like?

What does the text suggest? S.O.W.?

What is the divine solution?
How can we visualize it?
How can we make it happen? What are the steps?

RESOURCES

The photo “stacks of memo pads 2″ is by wintersoul1
and is from https://www.flickr.com/photos/aquariawintersoul/4256202207/in/photolist-7u79CF courtesy of the Flickr.com Creative Commons license.

This post is based on the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … preached June 11, 2017, at Kinmundy United Methodist Church.
Slides and audio for this message can be downloaded from http://www.disciplewalk.com/K_Sermons_June_Aug_2017.html

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Posted in MONDAY SCHOOL | Leave a comment

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #3

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #3 – thoughts from the message from the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer
#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … At Kinmundy United Methodist Church.

 

 

Second story. How long, oh Lord? I would like to tell you that I am very thrifty. Let’s call it that. I used to do the grocery shopping when I was single, and before that, I was in charge of the grocery shopping, and I had a little system. You go the grocery store. If there’s something that you use and it’s 10% off, you buy 1 whether you need it or not. It’s 20% off, you buy 2 whether you need it or not. If it’s 30% off, you buy 3 whether you need it or not. If it’s 50% off, you bring home 5 whether you need it or not. I want to tell you, Shop ‘n Save, which is a grocery store that I would go to, they once had a three week – it might have been longer than that – sale on chili beans, and I brought home– it was either four or five cans every time I went to the store because I like chili but there came a time where I looked up into the pantry, and I saw that I had 90 cans of chili beans.

Now, the way I make chili is you take a crock pot, you put the three cans of beans on the bottom of it, and you put a pound of hamburger on top. And you put diced onions across there, and then you sprinkle it with chili powder, and then you let it cook all day. I had 30 batches of chili, each one that would last me 3 or 4 days, in the pantry. Friends, “Give us this day our daily bread” was not something I needed to pray for a long time.

Kim and I have a resolution. Within the next month or so, we hope to eat all the way down to the bottom of our freezer. How many of us don’t need to pray for daily bread because you’ve got weeks or months stored away? It’s something we could be grateful for.

Let me give you another sad and a little bit disturbing fact. My doctor says that I’m overweight. My doctor has not explained the math to me, but let me give you the math. One pound of overweight is the equivalent of 3,700 calories. If you eat 3,700 calories more than you need, you put it right here because your body is getting ready for the next famine. I would like you to know my body has been getting ready for the next famine, my whole life long. 3,700 calories, one day ought to be about 1,200 calories. Do you realize that here I have the food for an entire year, and I carry it around with me? I do not need to be praying for my daily bread for a very, very long time.

 

THINKING IT THROUGH

What gets your attention? Why?

What is the human need or problem here?
What is that like?

What does the text suggest? S.O.W.?

What is the divine solution?
How can we visualize it?
How can we make it happen? What are the steps?

RESOURCES

The photo is from http://www.iheartpublix.com/2015/10/bushs-chili-beans-just-23%C2%A2-per-can-at-publix/

This post is based on the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … preached June 11, 2017, at Kinmundy United Methodist Church.
Slides and audio for this message can be downloaded from http://www.disciplewalk.com/K_Sermons_June_Aug_2017.html

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Posted in MONDAY SCHOOL | Leave a comment

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #2

MONDAY SCHOOL for June 11, 2017, #2 – thoughts from the message from the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer
#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … At Kinmundy United Methodist Church.

 

 

Let me tell you three true stories. Here’s the first one. This story is long. And it’s so beautiful I actually wanted to read it to you. It comes from a book by Pete Walker, who is a therapist dealing with complex post-traumatic stress disorder. A very interesting man. He, in his life, has suffered greatly from anxiety and stress himself. And in order – one time when he was a young man – to find himself, he began to tour the world with almost no money at all. And in this part of his journey, he’s talking about coming from one part of India to another. Here’s what he says. “I was sitting in my cramped second-class seat with the untouchables – those are the poorest of the poor in India – chickens, and goats, reading an English version of an Indian newspaper. The paper informed me that my destination, Calcutta, was now inundated with 100,000 refugees from Bangladesh, who had just fled their flood-swamped homes. They were all apparently sleeping on the downtown streets in the recesses between the protruding second floors of all the buildings that lined the streets. I came in late at night and sure enough, sleeping bodies wrapped in sheets, shoulder to shoulder, lined the streets everywhere. I checked into a 20 cent a night hotel that a fellow traveler had told me about.” Now just imagine for a minute what a hotel that charges 20 cents a night would be like. Just let that sink in. I slept unevenly, dreading the sight that I would behold the next morning. How would I handle viewing masses of desperate people, especially when I had nothing to give? I doubted that I even had enough money to make it to Australia, where hopefully I could replenish my wallet.

“I was sitting in my cramped second-class seat with the untouchables – those are the poorest of the poor in India – chickens, and goats, reading an English version of an Indian newspaper. The paper informed me that my destination, Calcutta, was now inundated with 100,000 refugees from Bangladesh, who had just fled their flood-swamped homes. They were all apparently sleeping on the downtown streets in the recesses between the protruding second floors of all the buildings that lined the streets. I came in late at night and sure enough, sleeping bodies wrapped in sheets, shoulder to shoulder, lined the streets everywhere. I checked into a 20 cent a night hotel that a fellow traveler had told me about.” Now just imagine for a minute what a hotel that charges 20 cents a night would be like. Just let that sink in. I slept unevenly, dreading the sight that I would behold the next morning. How would I handle viewing masses of desperate people, especially when I had nothing to give? I doubted that I even had enough money to make it to Australia, where hopefully I could replenish my wallet.

When I finally nudged myself down the stairs late the next morning, I was aghast at the transformed scene on the streets. Sheets had been spread out like picnic blankets, and each hosted happy families. Little portable stoves produced meals and cups of tea. People bantered with incredible vitality and enthusiasm, and children– children. This was the part he writes that was emblazoned on my memory. Children crawled all over their parents, especially their fathers, in affectionate, playful gymnastics that their fathers seemed to love as much as they did. Children can find a playground anywhere. And I guess it’s a wonderful thing to be a jungle gym for your child. But he goes on to write, “I was flooded with a melange of feelings, unlike anything I had ever experienced before. A strange cocktail of relief, delight, and anxiety.”

When he came down the stairs, he expected to see nothing but despair, but what he saw was families who were living grateful for what they had today. They had survived. They were in a place where they could be together, and rather than the children catching fear from their parents, the parents saw to it that even in this strange new home which is a sidewalk, the children could be happy because their family was together. These people understood what it meant to pray. Give us this day our daily bread, and then be thankful because, for today, they were okay. For today, they were okay.

THINKING IT THROUGH

What gets your attention? Why?

What is the human need or problem here?
What is that like?

What does the text suggest? S.O.W.?

What is the divine solution?
How can we visualize it?
How can we make it happen? What are the steps?

RESOURCES

The photo “Footpath dwellers, Mumbai, India”
is by Timothy Neesam
and is from  https://www.flickr.com/photos/neesam/3428805863/in/photolist-pXqjdT-nBTSjz-nBTfdj-j7cX3r-4JdFqN-pVto5S-47yc5p-a5nWzY-5zKM1L-r2JJLk-z8TxNE-qvW2YY-4tvFbe-4vuVA7-gezE1D-4BXVM7-ytsfxb-z8RdYb-z8RpUs-yts2q9-qeqVPd-8v58eJ-6dZwwt-qyEGuy-3bz2dj-4tJXyW-qvPETT-jgz5wE-qvVQeL-zEbea4-E6daN3-E6xJDz-EurQe2-E6ddQ5-pzevGk-qvZySD-qeqR39-qexRw2-pEbzq8-ac1uG-qerEfs-qerEX9-b9ih3B-pzeuS4-ytA8ai-rs2tBj
courtesy of the Flickr.com Creative Commons license.

This post is based on the sermon series: The Lord’s Prayer#4: Green Pastures, Still Waters, Souls at Peace … Mat 6:11 Give us this day our daily bread … preached June 11, 2017, at Kinmundy United Methodist Church.
Slides and audio for this message can be downloaded from http://www.disciplewalk.com/K_Sermons_June_Aug_2017.html

All Scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright © 1946, 1952, and 1971 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Posted in MONDAY SCHOOL | Leave a comment